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Culturally-Competent Helping Requirements for Counselors ...

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Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 1. Acknowledge that affectional orientations are unique to individuals and they can vary greatly among and across different populations of LGBQQ people. Further, acknowledge an LGBQQ individuals’ affectional orientation may evolve across their life span.C. 2. Acknowledge and affirm identities as determined by the individual, including preferred labels, reference terms for partners, and level of “outness.”
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 3. Be aware of misconceptions and/or myths regarding affectional orientations and/or gender identity/expression (e.g., that bisexuality is a “phase” or “stage,” that the majority of pedophiles are Gay men, Lesbians were molested or have had bad experiences with men).C. 4. Acknowledge the societal prejudice and discrimination experienced by LGBQQ persons (e.g., homophobia, biphobia, sexism) and collaborate with individuals in overcoming internalized negative attitudes toward their affectional orientations and/or gender identities/expressions.
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 5. Acknowledge the physical (e.g., access to health care, HIV, and other health issues), social (e.g., family/partner relationships), emotional (e.g., anxiety, depression, substance abuse), cultural (e.g., lack of support from others in their racial/ethnic group), spiritual (e.g., possible conflict between their spiritual values and those of their family’s), and/or other stressors (e.g., financial problems as a result of employment discrimination) that may interfere with LGBQQ individuals’ ability to achieve their goals.C. 6. Recognize that the counselor’s own affectional orientation and gender identity/expression are relevant to the helping relationship and influence the counseling process. Use self-disclosure about the counselor’s own affectional orientation and gender identity/expression judiciously and only when it is for the LGBQQ individual’s benefit.
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 7. Seek consultation and supervision from an individual who has knowledge, awareness, and skills working with LGBQQ individuals for continued self-reflection and personal growth to ensure that their own biases, skill, or knowledge deficits about LGBQQ persons do not negatively affect the helping relationships.C. 8. If affectional orientation and/or gender identity/expression concerns are the reason for seeking treatment, counselors acknowledge experience, training, and expertise in working with individuals with affectional orientation and/or gender identity/expression concerns at the initial visit while discussing informed consent and seek supervision and/or consultation as necessary.
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 9. Understand that due to the close-knit nature of LGBTQIQA communities, multiple relationships with LGBQQ individuals are not always avoidable or unethical and may affect the helping relationship. Counselors should seek appropriate supervision and/or consultation in order to foster ethical practices.C. 10. Recognize the emotional, psychological and sometimes physical harm that can come from engaging clients in approaches which attempt to alter, “repair,” or “convert” individuals’ affectional orientation/gender identity/expression. These approaches, known as reparative or conversion therapy, lack acceptable support from research or evidence and are not supported by the ACA or the APA. When individuals inquire about these above noted techniques, counselors should advise individuals of the potential harm related to these interventions and focus on helping clients achieve a healthy, congruent affectional orientation/gender identity/ expression.
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 11. Understand the unique experiences of Bisexuals and that biphobia is experienced by Bisexuals in the LGBTQIQA and heterosexual communities.C. 12. Ensure that all clinical-related paperwork and intake processes are inclusive and affirmative of LGBQQ individuals (e.g., including “partnered” in relationship status question, allowing individual to write in gender as opposed to checking male or female).
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 13. Recognize that individuals’ LGBQQ identity may or may not relate to their presenting concerns.C. 14. Conduct routine process monitoring and evaluation of the counselor’s service delivery (treatment progress, conceptualization, therapeutic relationship) and, if necessary, reevaluate their theoretical approach for working with LGBQQ individuals given the paucity of research on efficacious theoretical approaches for working with LGBQQ individuals.
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 15. Recognize and acknowledge that, historically, counseling and other helping professions have compounded the discrimination of LGBQQ individuals by being insensitive, inattentive, uninformed, and inadequately trained and supervised to provide culturally proficient services to LGBQQ individuals and their loved ones. This may contribute to a mistrust of the counseling profession.C. 16. Understand the coming “out” process for LGBQQ individuals and do not assume individuals are heterosexual and/or cisgender just because they have not stated otherwise. Individuals may not come out to their counselors until they feel that they are safe and can trust them, they may not be out to themselves, and this information may or may not emerge during the process of counseling. A person’s coming “out” process is her/hir/his own, and it is not up to the counselor to move this process forward or backward but should be the decision of the individual. The counselor can help the individual understand her/hir/his feelings about coming out and offer support throughout the individual’sprocess.
Culturally-Competent Helping Requirementsfor Counselors working with LGBT Clients
C. 17. Demonstrate the skills to create LGBQQ affirmative therapeutic environments where disclosure of affectional orientation is invited and supported, yet there are not expectations that individuals must disclose their affectional orientation.C. 18. Continue to seek awareness, knowledge, and skills with attending to LGBQQ issues in counseling. Continued education in this area is a necessity for competent counseling due to the rapid development of research and growing knowledge base related to LGBQQ experience, community, and life within our diverse,heterocentric, and ever-changingsociety.

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Culturally-Competent Helping Requirements for Counselors ...