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Limerick Flying Club - Eir

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Limerick Flying Club
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Statutory Instruments333of 2000 PERSONNEL LICENSING72of2004RULES OF THEAIR61 of2006OPERATIONSIAA, Publications, LegislationIrish Aeronautical PublicationIAA, Publications, Integrated Aeronautical Information PackageJAADocumentsJAR-FCL1Flight Crew Licensing (Aeroplane)JAR-FCL3 Flight Crew Licensing (Medical)http://www.jaa.nl/publications/section1.htmlIrish Aviation Law for Pilots
ICAO
International Civil Aviation OrganisationA specialized agency of the United Nations, theInternational Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)was created in 1944 (by the Chicago Convention) to promote the safe and orderly development of international civil aviation throughout the world. It sets standards and regulations necessary for aviation safety, security, efficiency and regularity, as well as for aviation environmental protection. The Organization serves as the forum for cooperation in all fields of civil aviation among its 190 Member States.AnnexesStandard Procedures and Recommended Practices (SARPS)http://www2.icao.int/en/home/default.aspx
JAA
Joint Aviation AuthoritiesTheJoint Aviation Authorities (JAA)was an associated body of the European Civil Aviation Conference (ECAC) representing the civil aviation regulatory authorities of a number of European States who had agreed to co-operate in developing and implementing common safety regulatory standards and procedures. This co-operation was intended to provide high and consistent standards of safety and a "level playing field" for competition in Europe. Much emphasis was placed on harmonising theJAAregulations with those of the USA.Joint Aviation Requirements (JAR)http://www.jaa.nl/introduction/introduction.html
EASA
European Aviation Safety AgencyTheEuropean Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)promotes the highest common standards of safety and environmental protection in civil aviation in Europe and worldwide. It is the centrepiece of a new regulatory system which provides for a single European market in the aviation industry.http://www.easa.europa.eu/home.php
IAA
Irish Aviation AuthorityTheIrish Aviation Authority (IAA)is a commercial semi state company employing approximately 700 people at six locations around Ireland. The IAA has two main functions; the provision of air traffic management & related services in Irish controlled airspace and the safety regulation of the civil aviation industry in Ireland.Statutory Instruments (Orders) (SI)Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP)http://www.iaa.ie
Licensing
9. Validity Periods of Licences, Ratings, Examiner Authorisations and Medical Certificates(1) The validity of a licence shall be determined by the validity of the ratings contained therein. Subject to the provisions of this Order a pilot licence, issued or re-issuedthereunder, shall remain effective for a period not exceeding 5 years or such other period as may be specified in respect of a particular class of licence by a direction under this Order.(2) The validity period of a rating issued to a pilot or flight engineer, as applicable, shall be as follows:-Single-pilot Aeroplane Class Rating 2 YearsMulti-engine Aeroplane Class Rating 1 YearType Rating (Aeroplane & Helicopter) 1 Yearor, as otherwise directed or, in the case of aJAAlicence, as specified in the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements.SI 333 of 2000Irish Aviation Law, Page 6
Validity Periods of Medical Certificates
The validity period of a medical certificate in respect of a pilot shall be as follows:-(b) Class 2 Medical Certificate -issued before the applicants 30th birthday 5 Yearsissued from age 30 and before applicants 50th birthday 2 Yearsissued from age 50 and before applicants 65th birthday 1 yearabove the age of 65 6 monthsor, as otherwise directed or, in the case of aJAAlicence, as specified in the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements.SI 333 of 2000Irish Aviation Law, Page 4
23. Production of Licences & 25. Logbooks
A person who is required by the provisions of this Order to hold a licence and who is required by-(a) an authorised officer of the company, or(b) a person authorised for the purpose of this Article by the Authority, or(c) a member of the GardaSiochana,to produce the licence for inspection by such person, shall forthwith produce the licence for such inspection.(5) A person who is required by the provisions of this Article to keep or preserve a logbook and who is required by-(a) an authorised officer of the company, or(b) a person authorised by the Authority for the purpose of this Article, or(c) a member of the GardaSiochana,to produce for inspection such a logbook by such person, shall, within a reasonable time, produce for such inspection any such logbook wherein an entry has been made.SI 333 of 2000Irish Aviation Law, Page 3
25. Logbooks
(1) A person licensed or undergoing training under the provisions of this Order to act in any of the capacities specified in paragraph (1) of Article 6 of this Order shall keep a record of the flights completed in a logbook in such form as may be required or approved by the Authority or, for aJAAlicence, as required by the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements.Entries in a pilots’ logbook shall be made in conformity with the requirements of Schedule VII to this Order or, where appropriate, as required by the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements.(a) the date and the places at which the holder embarked on and disembarked from the aircraft and the time spent during the course of a flight when acting in either capacity;(b) the type and registration marks of the aircraft;(c) the capacity in which the holder acted in flight;(d) particulars of any special conditions under which the flight was conducted, including night flying and instrument flying; and(e) particulars of any skill test or examination undertaken whilst in flight.Entries in a logbook shall be made in ink and shall be kept up to date.SI 333 of 2000
5.Flight Crew Members to be Licensed &38. Age Limits
(5) (a) a person undergoing dual instruction for the purpose of obtaining a student pilot’s licence shall be not less than 15 years of age and shall be not less than 16 years of age before undertaking an initial solo flight;Applicants for the issue of pilot licences shall be not less than the ages respectively shown hereunder on the date of application-Student pilot 16 yearsPrivate pilot 17 yearsSI 333 of 2000
39. Medical Requirements
(1) Subject to the provisions of paragraph 3 of Schedule VIII to this Order, applicants for the issue or re-issue of pilot licences shall, currently, meet the following standards of medical requirements set out in that Schedule or, for aJAAlicence, the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements -Medical AssessmentStudent pilot Class 2Private pilot Class 2SI 333 of 2000
7. Medical Fitness
The holder of a licence to act in any capacity as a flight crew member shall not exercise the privileges of that licence during any period in which that person is aware ofany illness or decrease in medical fitnesssuch that, for the time being, the medical requirements specified in paragraph (1) above cannot be met in that case.The holder of a licence,other than aJAAlicence, to act in any capacity as a flight crew member shallmake a declaration to the Authority-(a) immediately, ofany accidentwhich may occur to the holder during the performance of that holder’s duties, or of any accident which may otherwise happen to the holder and whichinvolves any incapacity for work;(b) ofany illness involving incapacity for work during ten days or more, as soon as the period of ten days has elapsed;(c) immediately, ofany medical operation or investigationinvolving, in either case,incapacity for work;andshall not exercise the privilegesof that licence until amedical report has been furnished to the Authority, giving the nature of the injury, illness or other cause of incapacity, the treatment received and that holder’s present condition and the licence holder has, in the light of such report, either been medically re-examined anddeclared fit so to act or has been informed by the Authority that such medical re-examination is not required.Theholder of aJAAflight crew licenceshall, on becoming aware of a decrease in medical fitness, comply with the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements (JAR-FCL- Medical) in that regard.(4) The holder of a licence to act in any capacity as a flight crew member may be required by the Authority to submit from time to time to further medical examinations carried out in accordance with arrangements approved by the Authority or, in the case of aJAAlicence, as required by the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements.A licence to act in any capacity as a flight crew member issued or validated under this Order shall be deemed to besuspended upon the pregnancyof the holder beingdiagnosedand shall remain suspended until the holder has been medicallyexamined after the termination of the pregnancyand has beenassessed as fitto resume the exercise of the privileges of the licence.SI 333 of 2000
41. Aircraft Ratings
(1) Aircraft ratings shall comprise:-(a) category ratings; (b) class ratings; (c) type ratings.(2) Category ratings shall comprise:-(a) aeroplane; (b) rotorcraft (e.g. helicopter or gyroplane); (c) glider; (d) free balloon.(3) Class ratings shall comprise: (a) for aeroplanes:(i) single-engine piston, land;(ii) single-engine piston, sea;(iii) multi-engine piston, land;(iv) multi-engine piston, sea;(v) single-engine turboprop, land.(4) Type ratings shall comprise:-(a) a rating for each type of multi-engine turbo propeller single-pilot aeroplane;(b) a rating for each type of aeroplane certificated for multi-pilot operation;(c) a rating for each type of helicopter and for each unconventional type of aircraft;(d) in any case not provided for in sub-paragraphs (a), (b) or (c) of this paragraph, a rating for each type of aircraft where so required for the exercise of the privileges set out in Article 46 of this Order or directed under sub-paragraph (b) of paragraph (1) of that Article, or in the case of aJAAlicence, in accordance with the applicable Joint Aviation Requirements.SI 333 of 2000
2. Student Pilot Licence Privileges
The privileges of the holder of a Student Pilot Licence toact as pilot-in-commandand the limitations to be observed in exercising such privileges are as follows:-(1) all flights shall be made under thesupervision and authorityof a duly authorisedinstructor;(2) allsolo flightsshall be made within theterritorial limitsof the state unless otherwise permitted by the Authority;(3)no personother than aninstructoror an authorisedexaminermay becarriedin the aircraft;(4)no cross-countryflight may be undertaken unless and until a duly authorised flight instructor hascertifiedthat the holder of the student pilot licence:-(a) haspassedto the satisfaction of such flight instructor anexaminationin air navigation, rules of the air and air traffic control procedures, elementary map reading and the use of the compass in flight; and(b) iscompetentto undertake cross-country flight.SI 333 of 2000, SCHEDULE 1, PART I
1. Private Pilot Licence Requirements
(1) KnowledgeThe applicant shall pass an examination in at least the following subjects:-(a) Air Law:(b) Aeroplanes - General Knowledge:(c) Flight Performance and Planning:(d) Human Performance and Limitations:(e) Meteorology:(f) Navigation:(g) Operational Procedures:(h) Principles of flight:Radiotelephony:SI 333 of 2000,SCHEDULE 1, PART IIIrish Aviation Law, Page 5
1. Private Pilot Licence Requirements –(cont’d)
(3) Experience(a) The applicant shall have satisfactorily completed as pilot of aeroplanes not less than45 hoursof flight time which shall include not less than:-(i)10 hours of solo flight time, supervised by a duly authorised flight instructor, including at least5 hours of solo cross-countryflight time with at least one solo cross-country flight totalling not less than150 nautical milesin the course of whichfull-stop landings at twodifferent aerodromes shall be made;(ii)5 hours of instrumentinstruction time of which not more than 2 hours may be instrument ground time; and(iii)5 hours as pilot-in-command or dual instruction flight time during the 90 day periodimmediately preceding the date of application.If the privileges of the licence are to be exercised atnight, the applicant shall have completed anadditional 5 hoursof flight time at night in an aeroplane, including3 hours of dualinstruction with navigational instruction and5 solo take-offs, circuits and full-stop landings.SI 333 of 2000, SCHEDULE 1, PART IIIrish Aviation Law, Page 5
2. Private Pilot Licence Privileges and Limitations
The privileges of the holder of a valid Private Pilot Licence (Aeroplane) and the limitations to be observed in exercising such privileges are as follows:-(1) Privileges:to act, butnot for remuneration(save where given in the circumstances mentioned in the proviso to paragraph (2) of Article 2 of this Order) -(a)as pilot-in-command or as co-pilotof any aeroplane, when operated as aprivate aircraft, of the type ortypes specifiedin the aircraft rating on thelicence;(b)as pilot-in-command or as co-pilotof any aeroplane when operated asa private aircraft, of theclass specifiedin the aircraft rating on thelicencewhich is not certificated for operation by a multi-pilot crew and which is not an aeroplane of an unconventional type.(2) Limitations:(a) Before exercising the privilegesat night, the licence holder shall have complied with therequirementsspecified in sub-paragraph (3)(b) of paragraph 1;The holder of a private pilot licence (aeroplane)shall notact as pilot-in-command of an aeroplanecarrying passengersunless within thepreceding 90 daysthat holder hasmade three take-offs, circuits and landings as the sole manipulatorof the controls in an aeroplane of thesame type or class; if the privileges are to be exercised at night the holder shall have completed the aforementionedrequirements by night.SI 333 of 2000, SCHEDULE 1, PART IIIrish Aviation Law, Page 6
S.I.No. 72 of 2004RULES OF THE AIR
GENERAL FLIGHT RULES2. Negligent or Reckless OperationAn aircraft shall not be operated in a negligent or reckless manner so as to endanger life or property.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 29
3. Minimum heights
(1) Except as permitted by the appropriate authority or as hereinafter provided aircraft shall not be flown:(a) overcongested areasof cities, towns or settlements or over an assembly of persons, at less than:(i) a height of 450 metres (1,500 ft) above the ground or water, or(ii) a height of 300 metres (1,000 ft) above the highest obstacle within a radius of600 metresfrom the aircraft, or(iii) such other height as would permit, in the event of the failure of a power unit, asafe forced landingto be made,whichever height is the greatest.(b) elsewhere:(i)closerthan 150 metres, (500 ft) to any person, vehicle, vessel or structure, or(ii) at aheightless than 150 metres (500 ft) above the ground or water,(c) over or in the immediate vicinity of any place within the State, where a large number of persons is assembled in the open air in connection with any event of public interest or entertainment, save when:(i) such flights are made with the written consent of the Authority and of the organisers, if any, of the event and are in accordance with any conditions or limitations specified by the Authority, or(ii) the aircraft is passing by in the normal course of navigation and flying at a height in compliance with subparagraph (a) of this paragraph.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 29
3. Minimum heights –(cont’d)
(3) Paragraph (1)(b) of this Rule shallnot applyto:(a) an aircraft while it islanding or taking-offin accordance with normal aviation practice at an aerodrome or heliport;(b) an aircraft when it is in use foraerial application or aerial workwith thepermissionof the Authority and is operated in accordance with any conditions or limitations specified with such a permission;(c) a helicopter conducting training for life-saving operations or demonstrations of such operations;(d) a glider while it is hill soaring;(e) an aircraft flying with thepermissionof the Authority for the purpose ofpicking up or dropping tow ropes, banners or similar articles at an aerodrome.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 29
4. Cruising Levels
(1) The cruising-levels at which a flight or a portion of flight is to be conducted shall be in terms of:(a)Flight Levels, for flights at orabovethelowest usable flight levelor, where applicable,above the transition altitude;(b)Altitudes, for flightsbelow the lowest usable flight levelor, where applicable, at orbelow the transition altitude.When required by this Order to fly at a cruising level appropriate to track, the pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall conduct the flight at a cruising level in accordance with the Tables in this Rule, using the altimeter setting appropriate to the airspace in which the flight takes place.(4) In the table in this Rule “track” means magnetic track.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 24
Table of Cruising LevelsAIPENR1.7-3
Altimetry Definitions
Altitude (ALT) -the vertical distance of a level, a point or an object considered as a point, measured from mean sea level (MSL)(QNH)Flight Level (FL) -a surface of constant atmospheric pressure which is related to a specific pressure datum of 1013.2hectopascals(hPa) and is separated from other such surfaces by specific pressure intervals(QNE)Height (HGT) -the vertical distance of a level, a point, or an object considered as a point, measured from a specified datum(QFE)Transition Altitude (TA) -the altitude at or below which the vertical position of an aircraft is controlled by reference to altitudes(5000 ft)The pressure type altimeter, calibrated in accordance with the Standard Atmosphere.a. when set to aQNHaltimeter setting will indicateALTITUDE;b. when set to aQFEaltimeter setting will indicateHEIGHTaboveQFEreference datum;c. when set to a PRESSURE of 1013.2hPAmay be used to indicateFLIGHT LEVELS.S.I.No. 72 of 2004, Rule 1Irish Aviation Law, Page 27AIPENR1.7 - 1
5. Dropping of persons and articles, aerial application and aerial work
No person or article shall be dropped from an aircraft in flight that might create a hazard to that person, other persons or property.(2) Nothing shall be dropped from an aircraft flying within the State save in accordance with permission given by the Authority and subject to any conditions and limitations contained in such permission.(3) Paragraph (2) of this Rule shall not apply to the dropping of articles by or with the authority of the pilot-in-command of the aircraft in the following circumstances:(a) the dropping of articles for the purpose of saving life;(b) the jettisoning, in the case of emergency, of fuel or other articles in the aircraft;(c) the dropping of ballast in the form of fine sand or water;(d) the dropping of articles solely for the purpose of navigating the aircraft inaccordance with ordinary practice or with the provisions of this Order;(e) the dropping at an aerodrome in accordance with prescribed conditions ofropes, banners or similar articles towed by aircraft.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 29
6. Towing, Picking-up and Raising of Persons, Articles and Materials
(1) Subject to this Rule, an aircraft in flight in or over the State shall not, by means external to the aircraft, tow any articles or pick up or raise any person, animal, article or material unless:(a) (i) the certificate of airworthiness issued or rendered valid in respect of that aircraft under the law of the state in which the aircraft is registered authorises the use of the aircraft for that purpose, and(ii) the aircraft complies with any conditions or limitations prescribed as applicable to such flights; or(b) The flight is made in accordance with permission given by the Authority and subject to any conditions or limitation contained in such permission.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 29
8. Acrobatic Flight and Formation Flights
(1) No aircraft shall be flown acrobatically so as to constitute a hazard to air traffic.(3) Aircraft within the State shall not be flown acrobatically over cities, towns, or settlements or over an open-air assembly of persons except with the permission of the Authority and subject to any conditions or limitations contained in such permission.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
8. Acrobatic Flight and Formation Flights –(cont’d)
(4) Aircraft within the State shall not be flown acrobatically within controlled airspace, except with the consent of the appropriate air traffic control unit.(5) Aircraft shall not be flown in formation except by pre-arrangement between the pilots-in-command of the aircraft taking part in the flight and, for formation flight in controlled airspace in accordance with such conditions as are prescribed or notified by the appropriateATSauthority. The aircraft shall be flown in formation such that:(a) The formation operates as a single aircraft with regard to navigation and position reporting;(b) separation between aircraft in the flight shall be the responsibility of the flight leader and the pilots-in-command of the other aircraft in the flight and shall include periods of transition when aircraft are manoeuvring to attain their own separation within the formation and during join-up and break-away; and(c) a separation distance not exceeding 0.5 NM (1 km) laterally and longitudinally and 100 ft (30 metres) vertically from the flight leader shall be maintained by each aircraftS.I.No. 72 of 2004
Avoidance of Collisions
10. Proximity(1) An aircraft shall not be operated in such proximity to other aircraft as to create a collision hazard.(2) Aircraft shall not be flown in formation except by pre-arrangement and, when in controlled airspace classified as Class A, B, C or D as described in Rule 26 of this Schedule, with the permission of the appropriate Air Traffic Control Unit.Aircraft shall not be flown in formation over the congested areas of cities, towns or settlements or over an open-air assembly of persons within the State, save with the permission of Authority and subject to any conditions or limitations contained in such permission.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way
(1) General(a) The aircraft that has the right-of-way shall maintain its heading and speed, but nothing in these Rules shall relieve the pilot-in-command of an aircraft from the responsibility of taking such action, including collision avoidance manoeuvres based on resolution advisories provided by ACAS equipment, as will best avert a collision;(b) An aircraft, which is obliged by these Rules to keep out of the way of another aircraft, shall avoid passing over or under the other, or crossing ahead of it, unless passing or crossing well clear and taking into account the effect of aircraft wake turbulence.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way –(cont’d)
(2) Converging.When two aircraft are converging at approximately the same altitude, the aircraft that has the other on its right shall give way, except as follows:(a) power-driven heavier-than-air aircraft shall give way to airships, gliders and balloons,(b) airships shall give way to gliders and balloons,(c) gliders shall give way to balloons,(d) power-driven aircraft shall give way to aircraft which are seen to be towing other aircraft or objects.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way –(cont’d)
(3) (a) Approaching head-onWhen two aircraft are approaching head-on or approximately so and there is danger of a collision, each shall alter its heading to the right;(b) Right Hand Traffic RuleExcept when flying in controlled airspace and in accordance with instructions issued by the appropriate air traffic control unit, an aircraft which is flying within the State in sight of the ground and following a road, railway, canal or coastline, or any other line of landmarks, shall keep such line of landmarks on its left.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way –(cont’d)
(4) Overtaking(a) An aircraft that is being overtaken has the right of way and the overtaking aircraft, whether climbing, descending or in horizontal flight, shall keep out of the way of the other aircraft by altering its heading to the right, and no subsequent change in the relative positions of the two aircraft shall absolve the overtaking aircraft from this obligation until it is entirely past and clear of the overtaken aircraft;(b) For the purpose of this Rule, an overtaking aircraft is an aircraft thatapproaches another from the rear on a line forming an angle of less than 70 degrees with the plane of symmetry of the latter, that is to say, that it is in such a position with reference to the other aircraft that at night it should be unable to see either the aircraft's left (port) or right (starboard) navigation lights.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way –(cont’d)
(5) Landing(a) Aircraft in flight or operating on the ground or water shall give way to other aircraft landing or in the final stages of an approach to land;(b) When two or more heavier-than-air aircraft are approaching an aerodrome for the purpose of landing, aircraft at the higher level shall give way to aircraft at the lower level but the latter shall not take advantage of this Rule to cut in front of another which is in the final stages of an approach to land or to overtake that aircraft;(c) Notwithstanding subparagraph (b) of this paragraph, power-driven heavier than-air aircraft shall give way to gliders.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way –(cont’d)
(6) Emergency Landing.An aircraft that is aware that another is compelled to land shall give way to that other aircraft.(7) Taking-off.An aircraft about to take-off shall not attempt to do so until there is no apparent risk of collision with other aircraft. A taxiing aircraft on the manoeuvring area shall give way to aircraft taking-off or about to take-off.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way –(cont’d)
Surface movement of aircraft.In case of danger of collision between two aircraft taxiing on the movement area of an aerodrome the following shall apply:(a) when two aircraft are approaching head-on, or approximately so, each shall stop or where practicable alter its course to the right so as to keep well clear;(b) when two aircraft are on a converging course, the one which has the other on its right shall give way;(c) an aircraft which is being overtaken by another aircraft shall have the right-of way and the overtaking aircraft shall keep well clear of the other aircraft.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30
11. Right of Way –(cont’d)
(9) Taxiing on the Manoeuvring Area(a) An aircraft taxiing on the manoeuvring area shall stop and hold at all runway holding positions unless otherwise authorised by the aerodrome air traffic control unit.(b) An aircraft taxiing on the manoeuvring area shall stop and hold at all lighted stop bars and may proceed further when the lights are switched off.S.I.No. 72 of 2004Irish Aviation Law, Page 30

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Limerick Flying Club - Eir