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10 on 1 - Winthrop

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Writing More About Less
Attaining depth
Analyzing Evidence in Depth: “10 on 1”
How do you move from (a) making details speak and (b) explaining how evidence confirms and qualifies the claim to composing a paper?Phrased as a general rule 10 on 1 holds thatit is better to make ten observations or points about a single representative issue or example than to make the same basic point about ten related issues or examples(Writing Analytically, p. 207).
10 on 1
(conclusion, argument, main point, anecdote, etc.)
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Point 4
Point 5
Point 6
Point 7
Point 8
Point 9
Point 10
Representative Example:
Audience Interest
The more interesting claims you can make about your evidence and how it relates to your thesis, the more interesting your paper will be.The number “10” does not always have to be reached in drawing conclusions about your example; “you shoulddraw out as much meaning as possible from your best examples”(Writing Analytically, p.211).
Goals for 10 on 1
to locate the range of possible meanings your evidence suggeststo zoom in on specific variations within the general pattern of data foundto make you less inclined to cling to your first claim inflexiblyopen the way for you to discover a way of representing more fully the complexity of your subjectto slow down the rush to generalizationensure that when you arrive at a working thesis, it will be more specific and better able to account for your evidence.
Outcomes for 10 on 1
Pushes you to start thinking more critically about your topicAllows you to draw out the implications lying at the heart of your paperImpels your mind to create as many new and interesting claims as it can
Applying 10 on 1
Find 10 examples that share a trait (or as many examples, points, issues as you can).Focus on one of these for in-depth analysis.Proceeding in this way will guarantee that your example is representative.In doing 10 on 1 you will take one part of the whole,put it under a microscope, andthen generalize about the whole on the basis of your analysis.
Writing Development
The Four Stages
Writing Development: Stage 1
Dualism:typical of collegefreshmendualists believe in a fixed or single truth that is available toallwhen asked to choose between two or more alternatives, likely to do so based on the belief that a particular position is right or wrongdo not admit uncertainty and believe that authorities (teachers, texts, etc.) have the answers(From theInstructor's Manual forWriting and Reading Arguments: A Rhetoric and Reader, by Richard P.Batteiger)
Writing Development: Stage 2
Multiplicity: recognize that multiple views can be foundimpossible to be certain which arerightbecauseno way(writer believes)to compare or evaluate alternatives; all are equallyvalid(From theInstructor's Manual forWriting and Reading Arguments: A Rhetoric and Reader, by Richard P.Batteiger)
Writing Development: Stage 3
Relativism:recognize that most questions and issues are complex and uncertaincompare and evaluate competing positionsmay not know how to choose among equally plausible and convincing alternatives(From theInstructor's Manual forWriting and Reading Arguments: A Rhetoric and Reader, by Richard P.Batteiger)
Writing Development: Stage 4
Commitment toRelativism:use values to choose among available alternatives(From theInstructor's Manual forWriting and Reading Arguments: A Rhetoric and Reader, by Richard P.Batteiger)
Have developed CT Traits:HumilityCourageEmpathyIntegrityPerseveranceFaith in reasonFair mindedness(From Gerald M.Nosich,Learning to Think Thins Through , 2009)

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10 on 1 - Winthrop