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Idioms - inetteacher.com

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Idioms
A peculiar phrase that can NOT be taken literally
Heart Idioms
As a group, read each of the following idioms and match with the appropriate meaning. Write your answer on scratch paper or dry erase board.1. cross my heart _____ a. to give up2. lighthearted _____ b. cheerful, free from anxiety3. heart to heart _____ c. the most important part4. heartfelt _____ d. makes one feel good, happy5. warms the heart _____ e. to be sad over a loss6. broken hearted _____ f. serious talk7. lose heart _____ g. sincere8. heart of the matter _____ h. to swear to be telling the truth
Answers to heart idioms
As a group, read each of the following idioms and match with the appropriate meaning. Write your answer on scratch paper or dry erase board.1. cross my heartHa. to give up2. lightheartedBb. cheerful, free from anxiety3. heart to heartFc. the most important part4. heartfeltGd. makes one feel good, happy5. warms the heartDe. to be sad over a loss6. broken heartedEf. serious talk7. lose heartAg. sincere8. heart of the matterCh. to swear to be telling the truth
Where do idioms come from?
With each idiom below, try to figure out how the idiom was born.White Elephant--The legend is that a king once gave a rare white elephant to a person on his court whom he did NOT like. The white elephant was sacred and couldn’t be made to work, but it cost a fortune to feed and take care of. The man couldn’t give it away because it was a gift from the king. The elephant caused the man to lose his money and his home-----it was not a gift you would want!
Where do idioms come from?
With the idiom below, try to figure out how the idiom was born.Break a leg—Saying this to a performer is a tradition which means “Good Luck!” There was an old show business superstition that wishing someone good luck would jinx them and cause them to do poorly, so they would wish the performer just the opposite inhopes that he would do well!
Where do idioms come from?
With the idiom below, try to figure out how the idiom was born.Catch someone red-handedThis expression came from the circumstances of someone being caught in themiddleof murder with blood on his or her hands. It was obvious that he was guilty. Today it means thatsomeone is caught in the act of the crime.
Where do idioms come from?
With the idiom below, try to figure out how the idiom was born.Kick the bucketThis expression was used in England in the 16thcentury. It came from the practice of hanging a criminal by having him stand on a bucket, putting a noose around his neck, and then KICKING the bucket out from under him. Today the saying refers toany manner of death.
Where do idioms come from?
With the idiom below, try to figure out how the idiom was born.Bite the bulletThis expression came from the 19thcentury during war. There was a medical practice of giving a woundedsoldiera bullet to bite before he was operated on without anesthetics on the battlefield. Biting on the soft bullet was a way to deal with the painful situation. Today it means tojust go ahead and deal with the painful situation you have to go through.
Carousel Groups
You will need 1 piece of paper per group. Write all names on the paper.As you move from group to group, make sure you title each section on your paper.Discuss as a group and record the meanings of any idioms you know.
Answers to Horse Idioms
Horsing around------playing roughHold your horses------waitWild horses couldn’t keep me away–---- I will be thereStraight from the horse’s mouth------information came from the person it happened toDon’t put the cart before the horse –----keep things in the right order
Answers to Baseball idioms
Strike out------Didn’t meet the goalPlay ball-----– Get things startedA ball park figure------General estimateThrow a curve ball------Didn’t work out like you wanted; problems arosePlay hardball-------Not playing fairWay off base--------Wrong guess
Answers to Mouth Idioms
You took the words right out of my mouth-----You said what I was going to sayHe was born with a silver spoon in his mouth-------bornrichDon’t put words in my mouth.------ Don’t say I said something that Ididn’tPut your money where your mouth is.------Prove it!
Answers to Color idioms
She is blue.-----She issadHe is a redneck.-----He is a country boyShe has a green thumb.-----She has great luck with plantsHe’s yellow.-----He is a coward.
Answers to Food idioms
1. He’sa hot dog!He is ashow-off2. A hot tamale!She is beautiful!3. As cool as a cucumberHe is not nervous atall4. Give me some sugar!Give me a kiss!
Answer to Food idioms 2
1. A piece of cakeEASY!!!2. This is cheesy!Lame!3. As cold as iceNot very nice4. The apple of my eyeVery special person to me

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Idioms - inetteacher.com